Thursday, November 22, 2012

Grace Company Quilt Frame: Machine Quilting

It took a bit, but I got the thing going this morning.  I have decided, however, to switch to a class 15 end loading machine.  It may not have the height and depth that the 66 has, but having an accessible bobbin will help when the thread breaks.  And thread breakage is a reality with this kind of sewing.  At least for beginners.   I also think that a vertical hook will make better stitches.

There are tension issues when you quilt on a frame.  I had forgotten about that.  The bobbin tension needs to be pretty loose.

TOP

Bottom
It looks pretty good when going straight.  But not when meandering.  I can fix it.  But I see no sense in fussing with the 66 when I am going to go to a 15.

I do like the darning foot.  I don't like the feed dog cover.  It takes up just that much more room to make it impossible to change the needle with the cover in place.

I am putting this project aside now.  I have to get a 15 ready.  How glad am I that I did not spend more time on that other 66 I wanted to put on this machine.  Saved myself a lot of trouble.


6 comments:

  1. On my Juki, I fought tension issue on my quilting frame, then I discovered Magna-glide bobbins. I think they are only available in the L and M styles though, so not sure that would help you. Yes, an end loading machine would be very helpful for you. Also a needle with a bigger eye, like a metallic needle and a sharp tip. The bigger eye helps prevent thread breakage, and helps with the multi-directional sewing. Have fun, and have a great Thanksgiving.

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    1. I remembered that about the bigger eye and switched the needle. I am going to try the Jeans machine later. I just mounted it and it looks like that darning foot fits it. I do ok with the regular class 15 bobbin with my Bailey. I think the answer is the vertical hook. And better thread. I bet once I get the tension issues worked out the thread won't break. The tension is so much easier to adjust on the class 15 machine, end or front loader. (The jeans machine is a front loader but I think it will be fine. You would still have to crouch under the quilt to get to the bobbin front or end loader)

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  2. i tend to increase the top tension when fmq ing.( instead of loosening the bobbin) I also have to really concentrate to move the work at the same rate weather I am on a curve or not. I try and think "hot foot, cool hand" meaning I run the machine pretty near top speed. but move more slowly. I have had good luck fmq with my 201, but you are right, most people seem to prefer a class 15. I've never used a frame, though. no where to set one up. laura

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    1. Good points. Speed does make a difference.

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  3. I was getting the eyelashing on the back of my quilts using a 15 class end loader. I finally figured out I was going too fast meandering. It got better when I slowed down some but I could still occasionally see the needle flex on curves and knew there would be some bad stitches. Right now I'm using a '60s Brother front loader and it doesn't matter how fast or slow I move the quilt, I've not had one problem with bad stitches. I would love to have the room to use a frame. I have a large desk cabinet that holds the machine with another sewing table in front of it.

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    1. I will have to try my Brother if the White doesn't do a good job. Good points to remember. Thanks.

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