Saturday, November 19, 2011

Singer 328 K

I know that Bill Holman does not like these machines.  He is a very famous sewing machine guru who owns a couple of the sewing machine Yahoo groups.  I do like this machine.  It makes a pretty nice stitch and is strong and fast.   I bought it this past spring and cleaned it all up and oiled it.   Today I loosened the belt and adjusted the tension and now it is sewing just perfectly.  I think it is the perfect machine for a beginner sewist.
So I guess it is off to Craigs List now. 

41 comments:

  1. I have always thought these machines sounded a little loud, and for some reason, like a tractor....so I call this model a tractor. (Hope I just didn't scar you for life!)

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  2. I've had a 328 K for decades, and it's worked well for me. I have other vintage singers now, and they are better machines. But I still use and love my 328 K, purchased used with my tax return money in the mid-80's.

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  3. I think they look like a Mercedes....I wonder why Bill doesn't like them?

    On selling cabinets- I've had better luck selling them (empty) as end tables or desks. I always write (in pencil) in the drawers or somewhere what machine came out of it, in case someone wants to put a machine in it someday. I usually just use Howard's renew before selling them. Also, if they are from the 1950's the phrase "mid century modern" seems to be catnip on Cra-g's List.

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  4. Well, frankly who cares what Mr. Bill likes or dislikes. I've been using this model for 23 years and i love it. Here's why. I absolutely love the Singer 328k. It’s a wonderful machine for the beginner, occasional and everyday sewer. It’s great for mending and repair work. It has all the features the majority of sewers could want. With a basic zigzag, overcast stitch and a good range of decorative stitches for the rare times you need them. It comes with the all important yet often don’t get straight stitch foot and needle plate. They were built like a tank and will out last most new machines today. All metal gears in a light weight aluminum body. I love the sewing light is right were it’s needed, spot lighting the needle. And lastly, just like the 400 & 500 series. It comes in that easy on the eyes dark beige color. And if you work with a black or white machine. You know what i mean. If you find a complete one {machine, manual, attachments etc} either local or on e-bay. Grab it, there totally worth the few hundred they go for. This machine is best in a Singer cabinet. And will fit all post 1958 Singer cabinets. Enjoy!

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  5. Well, I have to agree with BuffaloSingerGuy. Just tonight I was thinking about how I missed this machine. I sold this one and am glad that I passed it along. I cannot sew on all the machines I have. But lately I have been thinking about machines that I can get and then pass along to new sew-ers. This 328 is just that machine.

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  6. Hi, I just acquired a 328K. Help, how do I adjust the belt tighter? It is in beautiful shape and I can't wait to sew with it. The belt appears almost new, but it will not turn the handwheel.

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  7. JCP
    I never had to adjust the belt on this 328. The Yahoo group vintagesingers probably can help. Good luck

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  8. I just picked one of these up, and the belt was slipping. Used some belt dressing on it (found at car stores) and the belt stopped slipping.

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    1. Great tip, thank you!

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  9. I have a 328K but the motor shot out a few sparks, then smelled and sent up a little flame. Needless to say, it doesn't work afterwards. I believe I need a new motor. SO I googled and found claims that ALL sewing machines take a "universal motor". Is that true for my ~50 year old 328K?
    Thanks,
    Rochelle

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  10. Rochelle,
    I believe that you can replace your motor with a universal motor. I recommend you buy one from Jenny at Sew Classic (see resources page) I bought one from her and it is a very nice motor and high quality and quiet.

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  11. Thank you Elizabeth! When I was searching, I have unfortunately come across several different universal motors! Are they all alike and can be retrofitted into the space for the motor in my 328K? I really appreciate your advice.
    I have to tell you all about my 328K. It is about 50 years old, I think. It was not used for many years and when I unscrewed surfaces, the insides are covered by a thick yellowish brown guck. We have been slowly taking out every piece, every little screw and soaking them in alcohol and brushing off the guck with an old toothbrush. It will need new belts too! But I think when we are done, it will work and gleam :-)
    Rochelle

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  12. Hi All! Here is correspondence I received from a seller of sewing machine motors re my quest for a new motor for my 328K:

    "Rochelle, I think you will have a difficult time converting a standard
    motor, many issues mounting holes do not match up etc. etc. etc... However
    we cannot predetermine someones mechanical ability... We have a standard
    motor #NA35K rated at 7000RPM's, cost $24.95 plus $6.95 S&H. John'

    So this is why I haven't yet tried ordering a "universal" motor. Do you think retrofitting an available new "universal" motor will have the challenges John describes above?
    Thanks!

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    1. Rochelle
      Without looking at the machine and the motor it is hard to tell. As I now recall, the motor in a 328 is NOT external. Sorry. I suggest that you join VintageSingers and ask there. You may need to get one from a donor machine.

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  13. My worry about a "universal" motor is that there are a number of them and therefore they may actually not universally fit all older machines. One seller told me that the screw holes may not be in the same place as the original motor. So I still need to know which model # motor can best be fitted into my 328K. It is SO tough getting answers to this from anybody! I contacted Singer and got no answer from them - the very one I thought ought to have the best info! Does anyone here have experience putting a replacement motor into their 328K? [PS Jenny is not available to email back currently}.

    Thank you,
    Rochelle

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    1. Join VintageSingers Yahoo group.....Really...they can help....honest.....

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  14. While cleaning the innards of my 328K I found a broken spring. It is part 170179 and this small spring is wrapped around a bolt-like piece labelled as part 140767. these numbers are from a Singer info web page. I think it relates to maintaining thread tension within the machine buut it does not touch the thread at all. There are no names of any part on that web page, only numbers, unfortunately for me. Do you happen to know where I mightt order this? All the web sites I have tried have no answer for me. I have even thought of taking this and the parts of the unit to a hardware store to see if they may have a matching spring for it. What do you think?

    BTW, my motor turns out to look clean and in good shape!

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    1. Rochelle

      That part looks to be part of the stitch length regulator mechanism according to a schematic I found on Brewer connect. Google 328 K parts, there is a PDF file listed for 328 parts schematic from Brewer Connect. Good luck. I think you have to be a dealer to order parts from them but you might find it elsewhere.

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  15. Hello all,
    I am thinking of buying a 328 and was wondering what type needle it uses? I know the319 uses a different needle.
    Thanks in advance....
    Sherry

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    1. The 328K takes a standard size 15 needle also known as a 130/705 system. the 319/306 and 206 take the 206X 13 sized needle.
      You can buy the standard needle anywhere fine (and not so fine) sewing machine needles are sold.

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  16. I cleaned my Singer 328k but wasn't able to test it out because I need a new plug for it. After recently using a Singer 600 Slant needle sewing machine, I was surprised at how far back the vertical needle on the 328k seems to sit on the bed.

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  17. Hi I just purchased a singer 328k but the thread keeps on ripping. Please help as I'm complete newbie to this but can't wait to start sewing. Thanks

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  18. Can you all please tell me the difference between a 328 and a 328k? Thank you!

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  19. I just bought a sewing cabinet at a garage sale for $30.00 and discovered a Singer 328K inside, barely hanging on 1 screw. I am refinishing the cabinet and decided to take apart and clean the machine. My 328K has a decal stating it was Made in Great Britain. Many of the parts also have Great Britain stamped on them. I saw on the Singer web site to look for 328 manuals, etc. SO, possibly the K stands for the fact that this machine is a 328 but made in Great Britain. My electrical cord has been cut and pieced (hiding under duct tape).I was wondering about the difference in electrical power in the UK in the '60's.

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    1. I think that if the motor is 110 you should be ok. Lots of singers were made in kilbowie, Scotland (hence the K) and marketed in the US. I have had plenty of K machines pass through here that are 110.

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    2. I have just purchased a 328P which I guess means that it came from Penrith Singer Factory. I think they were put together with parts from Scotland and distributed from the Penrith Factory, being at least second hand, it came incomplete,without a lid...that's fine, as it came with manual and 6 cams. Its pinkish...that's more than fine, but the needle-bar clamp is missing the part that the thread slips through before it enters the needle-hole, so of course it sews a few stitches and then the thread breaks...that's not so fine. Now to get a replacement part or make a repair...mmm, but it promises to be a wonderful sew-mate!

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    3. I can tell you that the 328P model comes from the Penrith Australia factory which was a subsidiary of Singer. You can read more about it on this link: http://www.singersewinginfo.co.uk/penrith/
      I bought one of these brand new in 1966. It was a major disappointment to me, not the quality of the 328K which I believe is made in England. My 328P could not sew a precise straight stitch and zig-zag was impossible on anything finer than cotton drill fabric. Also, the thread constantly broke. It spent more time back at the Singer repair shop than doing any sewing. I do hope you have had better luck than I did.

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  20. Hi I have just inherited my mother's 328k. Will this be a good machine for making a quilt? Do you know where I can get a 1/4 quilter foot. Can't wait to get started.

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    1. This machine will be fine for piecing. I don't know how it will handle a quilt sandwich. You likely can find a 1/4 quilter foot at Jenny at Sew Classic. See the Resources page located at the top of the blog

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    2. Shiela, I realize this is a bit late but I have a 328 I use for sewing heavy backpack material and it does fine going over up to 6 layers which other machines just stall at, for the sandwich Id really recommend a walking foot over a standard quarter inch foot though. This machine will take any screw on low shank walking foot, also if you havent located the quarter inch foot yet it will take a snap on low shank and feet.

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  21. Can someone possibly provide their opinion of a Singer 328 vs a Singer 223 Fashion Mate for a beginner?

    Thanks - Jake

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    1. Sew with each one. The 328 has a class 66 drop in bobbin and takes cams for decorative stitches.The 223 has a front loading class 15 bobbin and has straight stitch, zig zag and blind hem only. The 223 is heavier than the 328 IIRC. Personally I thin a front loading class 15 is better for a beginner because I think it will have less chance for thread nests.

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  22. Thank you very much for that information.

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  23. I have owned this machine for about 33 years and I love it. I have the 328 - Made in England. I was told that the K stands for machines made in Scotland. They are otherwise identical. This is durable and easy to use. I do not find it overly loud. I have never had any problem with it and it has never needed repair.

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  24. Hello,
    I am looking for helpful info on my mother-in-law Singer 328K - bobbin case is missing... anybody knows part number, or type, cross-reference? Maybe, even good place to buy it from... appreciate.

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    1. Dear Anonymous,
      I would love to help you. I choose not to do it in a dialogue through the blog. Please go to the top of the blog and email me via Contact me page.

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  25. I just bought my very own 328k. I would like to know why some 328k machines have a brass name plate and some don't. I chose to buy one without the brass plate, and would like to buy accessories. Is there s difference?

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    1. I don't know. The accessories (attachments) are common low shank attachments. the 328 takes the flat cams. Good luck

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  26. Hi I have had my Singer 328K for years and love it but want to know if you can do Free Motion Sewing on it. My instruction manuel says I can but I can't seem to get my head around how to make it happen! Anyone able to give me any advice?

    Thanks

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  27. I was just given a 328K, Great Britain, Singer - (The Sewing Machine Blue Book states that model#328 was manufactured between 1963 and 1965). It does not have the push on/push off light button that many 328Ks have. How do I turn on/off the light without unplugging the machine? Thanks ahead of time.

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    1. You don't. There is no on/off switch for the light on the earliest 328s.

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Thanks for reading. Do leave a comment. IF YOU HAVE A SPECIFIC QUESTION IT IS BEST TO EMAIL ME (see the top of the blog for address under Contact Me) . If you pose a question in the comments, likely I cannot respond unless I have your email address. Happy sewing!