Monday, July 22, 2013

What? Me Worry?

The 29 does have a bit of a drag when I turn the balance wheel.  I noticed some shiny metal when I turned it over on its side last night.  So I decided to check it out.  Not the most brilliant idea I have ever had.

I was tired, had indulged in my evening cholesterol lowering agent and thought I could just take a quick look.  After I removed the screws holding the bottom piece in place I tipped the machine right side up and a piece fell out.  I spent the next 40 minutes trying to figure out how to get it back together.  I did it.  But I wonder if the shuttle is now out of time  I will figure that out later.

 I wanted to show you this because this is where I think the drag is originating.  That shaft rubs on the metal piece and when I have had my morning blood pressure elevating agent vs the evening cholesterol lowering agent I can take this apart again and illustrate my concerns more clearly.

I am not too worried.  I think that somehow I can figure this out.  The machine moves better after a drink (the machine's, well, ahem, mine too) and some grease but something isn't quite right.

And in case you haven't had time to scour the WWW the way I did last night trying to figure out what part is missing, check out this photo and then you will see.
Singer 29-4
It is called an oil cup.  Apparently the thread passes under a wire spring that snaps down into the cup and lubricates the thread.   I think I can fashion something functional.  Won't be pretty or original.  But it will suffice.  I found the empty screw hole.  I know mine once had it.  Oh well.
Singer 29-2 Cobbler machine and treadle

11 comments:

  1. Thank goodness you were able to piece together how it could be fixed from those rare photos (I've never seen this model before!!) Onwards and upwards!

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  2. The treadle stand is the 'cat's pajamas'! Is the 29-2 a treadle vs the 29-4 a motor driven machine?

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    1. Nope I believe the 29-4 is a later version, it is a treadle as the photo above shows.

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  3. Here is restoration blog that may help: http://northants-restoration.blogspot.com 29k2

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  4. I just found your blog...It's really wonderful blog with good information about old sewing machine

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  5. I actually had a 29 treadle for a while in the 1980s, but it was out of time (or maybe had the wrong needle?) and I didn't manage to make it work. I gave it to a friend who said he could make it work. Do you have the extremely long thin metal rod with a little eye-hole on the end that is absolutely vital for threading it? It goes down through from the top somehow. (I'm embarrassed that I had it, lost it, and had to find a substitute- the world's longest straight upholstery needle, which when I filed down the excess width at the eye, fit into the machine and worked.)

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    1. I do not have the thread guide (if that's what you call it). I figure I can fashion something. First I have to clean it up.

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  6. Use a thin aluminum wire with a notch filed in the end. put the thread in the "v" of the notch. run it down the middle of the head, the wire should pop out the bottom right next to the needle. Grab the loop and bring the wire back up

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  7. The treadle is the way to go. You have so much more control with a treadle vs the electric stand. At one time I had three machines, all treadle stands, but I got beat out of them while I was out of town for a few weeks and when I got home, I found that they were given away, yes GIVEN away to a cousin. Now they're in HIS shoe shop. As far as threading, I have used a piece of straw from a broom. Just put the thread at the end of the straw, and simply push it through to the pressure foot. It'll work if you're in a pinch. I used that straw for over a year. I couldn't find another threader.

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  8. What you are looking at is the wax cup, not an oil cup. They used to put melted wax into that cup, the thread would get coated with the wax and it made the thread last longer in the wet, winter months.

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    1. Right. Thanks for setting me straight

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