Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Singer 115

Usually when I start on a machine, I finish it.  For some reason, I put this 115 away before I had it all together.  Today I decided it was time to finish it up.

I tried cleaning the hook in place as you can see.  I was not terribly successful.  So I took it off. 

Having recently worked on a 319 with a similar configuration (rotary hook with a stationary finger) I was able to re-assemble this.  But not until I had cleaned the hook.

I took that apart.  It was easy.  The two little screws came right out.
And the bobbin case base lifted out.

I scrubbed the hook with a honing stick, some sand paper and denatured alcohol.  I did the same for the bobbin case base.  I put it all back together.  It wasn't right. The bobbin case base was too loose.    I took it apart and fiddled with it and got it right.  I bet I spent more than an hour on this part alone.  But this is the crucial part.  No point in skimping here.

This was where I panicked a little.  I took the hook off of this machine eight months ago.  I was sure that I took photos but was too lazy to  fetch the computer and look at them.  So I figured it out.   The shaft had a flat.  There was one set screw missing from the hook.  I usually remove the set screw that houses the flat when I take off a hook that sits on a flat (e.g. FW) I replaced the hook positioning the vacant screw hole over the flat and tightened both set screws (I was clever enough to keep all of the screws).  It seemed to work.

Pretty nifty, eh? The bobbin case is brand new.   I don't have any idea what that cute little curly cue wire is for on the bobbin case.  The bobbin case photos in the manual doesn't seem to have that.  It works.  That's all I care about.

I also had to reassemble the presser foot bar, spring and presser bar lifter.  I set the presser bar height at exactly one EPIF (Elizabeth Perry Index Finger) height above the feed dogs.
The feed dogs were filthy.  I had to soak them in degreaser, scrub with a wire brush, pick out the lint with a dental picke and rinse in denatured alcohol.  They are stained, but clean.

 I put the repro hand crank on so that I could test the stitches.  I like it.  I think I will have to get another so that I can just keep this as a hand crank. ( I like to have a hand crank on the work bench for these Singers so that I can test stitch them without having to put the motor on)

I threaded the machine, guessing for the most part.  I have a manual for it; downloaded from ISMACS, but I did not have it in the shop.  Since it worked, I must have threaded it correctly.  Threading is the same principle from machine to machine.  Once you have an idea, you can pretty much figure out any machine.

It is about as clean as I can get it.  The machine was commissioned in 1916.  It has had a hard life.  But it stitches.  That, there, is a miracle. 



12 comments:

  1. The curly q wire on the Bob in case hold the thread in proper position. It's called a pigtail.
    Ruth

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  2. I have a machine that was purchased new by my great grandmother sitting in my garage in the 'before' condition. I hope I can get it working as well as you did! I've been kinda afraid to tackle it. You did great work on this on.

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    1. Yoanna, Go for it. You would be surprised what a little cleaning and oiling will do to these old machines. Take lots of photos and you should be fine

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  3. I love how take photos of the steps and explain what you do to clean and repair machines. I think I need to get my Singer 201 to you: it's starting to grumble at me when I begin to sew. Thanks for sharing what you do on your blog. I appreciate it.

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    1. C'mon over! I will show you what to do!

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  4. Elizabeth, this looks like my new treadle machine. Maybe because the parlor cabinet was used as furniture- lamp stand the machine does not have one bit of rust on it. Other than being dusty dirty and dull, it is in great shape. It stitches perfect. I wish the decals had more of a gold shine than a greeny dull gold, but they are mostly intact. However, I keep thinking a Red Eye might show off the cabinet more? Great photos of the bobbin area.
    I have a Spartan that I bought last year with the intention of making it a hand crank. I bought a new crank, an old spoked wheel, and then got no farther. I think it would be good to have a hand crank around. I could sew outside if it ever gets warm.
    Linda

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  5. Beautiful transformation! I love singer 15's and all their clones and variations. I know you love 201's, but for me the classic 15 body is the most elegant machine singer ever designed.

    ..."different stitches for different witches..."

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  6. Looks good. I have the same machine made in 1916 as well by the SN. Got mine used in an old antique store for almost nothing. A little oil and it works perfectly. These are great machines and I use mine to sew nylon straps for horse blankets. Hard to beat the styling and the honest durability. Have fun with yours.

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  7. My husband picked a 115 up for 20$ at an auction a few months ago. At least I think that's what it is. It has been converted to electric. I am trying to get it in workjng condition and am running into problems with the bobbin area. The bobbin seems loose and it seems like the needle hits or bumps something it shouldn't everybtime it goes down. The bobbin case does not "click" like I think it should. Mine does not have the pigtail you mentioned. But I never missed it because I didn't see it in the manual either. I would be grateful for any suggestions as to what is wrong.
    Thanks, Marla

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    1. Check the serial number against the list on the ISMACS site. If it is a 115 they have a manual at this link: http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_machine_company/manuals/singer-model-115-sewing-machine-manual.pdf

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  8. I purchased a 115 for $40. I am trying to change the check spring on the tension assembly. I can't get the tension stud out of the machine. I loosened the set screw (the larger one - the small screw will not budge). I have been turning the stud to the left, but nothing much seems to be happening, except the old check spring is going crazy. Any suggestions? I am at a stand-still. This is the last item I need to do.

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