Wednesday, January 4, 2017

RELIEF

I like the texture in this photo.  You can see the "relief" in the fabric.  I know, not true relief, but that was the word that came to mind so I am using it. 

Besides, it fits with my visit to a very warm and kind oncologist today.  Not that my diagnosis is any better than it was.  Marginal zone lymphoma is an indolent, slow growing lymphoma that tends to creep along.  Hence, chemotherapy may only keep it from transforming to the more aggressive kind.  Interestingly enough, the more aggressive kind, if that is what one gets "de novo," responds well to chemo because it is faster growing and chemo attacks fast growing cells. Not so if the indolent transforms to the aggressive. So why am I relieved?  Because I feel confidant in my care team.  I have also decided that I will respond to this treatment and be back on my bicycle by July, 2017.  Treatment starts in two weeks.  Six cycles at 4 week intervals.  No alopecia (hair loss) but maybe some fatigue and nausea and other GI symptoms that we will not discuss.    Sigh.   The usual neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia,  which will place me at risk for infection and bruising.  No contact sports so I guess my roller derby career is finished. Life is a balance.

15 comments:

  1. Boy, am I glad I don't understand medical jargon as it does not sound like a lot of fun times. I am glad you have a competent and caring team. I wish I could be of some help. I hope you will be well enough to keep quilting.

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    1. You are of tremendous help. Just because you are you. And I will be able to quilt. I am sure of it. If I can work, I can quilt!

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  2. I'll be sending good thoughts your way. I had a year of 2-weeks-on, 2-weeks-off chemo in 1979 (for breast cancer). You just take one step at a time, and let your family help you.

    Dot

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  3. Love the Log Cabin quilt. They are one of my faves. Also, prayer sent for the conquering of your cancer. On another front, I am a newbie at being obsessed with vinage sewing machines. I only have about 8 so far, but I am restoring each as I get it and keeping my eye out for bargains. I enjoy your blog, politics and all. Hang in there!

    Sharon Kirkpatrick Sanders

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    1. Thank you. Be careful. It's an addiction that can take over. Then you will love each one and have to sew with it. Nothing wrong with that. I loved every minute I spent in my shop. I know I will be back out there again. After all there is the Davis vertical feed and the darling little Singer chain stitcher to restore !

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  4. Please let us know how you are doing. I hope your first treatment goes well.

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  5. Dlizabeth, my baby sister has just finished a similar aggressive chemo package. It was successful in bringing the size of her tumour down 40 to50%. We are very thankful, as she is now going on a less vicious maintainance chemo schedule to keep the tumour from re growing. The cancer is not gone, but, it gives her time, and the possibility of some new discovery that will destroy that bloody tumour.
    Nest advice to you, is to keep your bucket handy, your husband and dogs cuddle ready, and insist that all the people you come in contact with are healthy, your immune system will be at zero, you can't afford a cold or flu. You will feel like hell. Try to take it out on close friends and telephone family. The family that you live with will be under enough stress, trying to deal with your illness too. Sometimes you are just going to to eed to vent, men can't take that. Vent to your sister, she has broad shoulders. She will be able to takeit. Men have to fix things. There are some things that they can't fix, but, if you are prepared, you might get through the chemo O.K.
    Sorry if you consider this post intrusive, but this is fresh in our family's experience. My sister is going to Cuba with her son, dil and grandchildren in another month,(she has to get some new smaller clothes) and she is feeling bouyant and positive again. We are relieved.
    My best wishes for an easier reaction to the chemo regimen. There is nothing anyone can say to make it feel better. I believe that you have the strength of self to get through iy. Post if you feel up to it, but our prayers will include you in them. Keep the chin up.

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  6. Hi Elizabeth - I've been a follower of your blog for about a year, but never left a comment. Yes, I'm a lurker. Sorry. I share your sewing machine obsession, but have kept it in check due to lack of space and a husband who, while wonderful, is not as tolerant about the sewing machines as yours. I so enjoy your writing, and your spunky political tones (and your dogs). I was wondering how you were doing after the election, but when you didn't post anything at first, I got distracted with the holidays and stopped looking until today. I am so sorry to hear about your health woes. I know it doesn't really help, but let me say it again - I am so sorry to hear about your health woes. My son had a carcinoid tumor removed from his appendix last year, and although it's not the same disease, I understand how the "slow growing" part is both a blessing and a curse. It sounds like you have a good medical team; good for you. I will be thinking of you and sending positive vibes for the next months. Looking forward to seeing pictures of you on your bike come July!

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    1. Thanks Rebecca. I will tell you this, as a mother and grandmother I would rather be sitting in the chemo chair than have any illness befall my child. I know you went through some sort of he!! with that one. I hope that now life is mundane and boring with only routine trips to see medical professionals.

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  7. Take care and get lots of rest. Praying for you.

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  8. Elizabeth, Wishing you all the best as you start your journey. Confidence in your team is very important! You can do this - you will be back on your bike before you know it!! In 2015, I was diagnosed with Stage 2 Ovarian & Stage 1 Uterine cancer. I had six chemo treatments, three weeks apart. The absolutely best advice I can give you is: ask questions, get & take all the anti-nausea meds they can give you; double your intake of protein everyday (normal for women is 45 grams a day - shoot for 80-90 grams & yes! ice cream counts!); drink water (Smart Water if you can) to flush the chemo drugs and help with the GI stuff. Sewing helps! Rest is important! Chemo cycles are predictable, listen to your body. Walking helps. Your diagnosis does not define you. Sending you all the best wishes!!!

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    1. WOW. Thanks for the advice. I am working on the protein intake. The water thing is harder. Sewing is the best. I wish you well.

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